Friday, July 30, 2010

Damage

I just re-read my post about destruction and realised I should show what it took me to implement damage. This might not be my most interesting post, as it is just code, but maybe some of you are interested. Get ready... there are about 200 lines of code coming for you!


public abstract class DamageEvent extends ReplaceableEvent {
    private MagicObject source;
    private int         ammount;
    private boolean     combat, preventable;
    
    public DamageEvent(MagicObject affected, MagicObject source, int ammount, boolean combat, boolean preventable) {
        this(you(ofInstance(affected)), source, ammount, combat, preventable);
    }
    
    public DamageEvent(Player affected, MagicObject source, int ammount, boolean combat, boolean preventable) {
        this(ofInstance(affected), source, ammount, combat, preventable);
    }
    
    public DamageEvent(Supplier affected, MagicObject source, int ammount, boolean combat, boolean preventable) {
        super(affected);
        this.source = source;
        this.ammount = ammount;
        this.combat = combat;
        this.preventable = preventable;
    }
    
    public MagicObject getSource() {
        return source;
    }
    
    /**
     * This method can be used by replacement effects that prevent or increase damage.
     */
    public void setAmmount(int ammount) {
        this.ammount = ammount;
    }
    
    public int getAmmount() {
        return ammount;
    }
    
    public boolean isCombatDamage() {
        return combat;
    }
    
    public boolean isPreventable() {
        return preventable;
    }
}



public class DamagePlayerEvent extends DamageEvent {
    private Player p;
    
    public DamagePlayerEvent(Player p, MagicObject source, int ammount, boolean combat, boolean preventable) {
        super(p, source, ammount, combat, preventable);
        this.p = p;
    }
    
    public Player getPlayer() {
        return p;
    }
    
    @Override
    protected boolean execute0() {
        CompoundEdit ed = new CompoundEdit(getGame(), true, "Deal damage");
        
        //118.3a. Damage dealt to a player causes that player to lose that much life.
        getPlayer().getLifeTotal().loseLife(getAmmount());
        
        ed.end();
        
        return true;
    }
}



public class DamagePermanentEvent extends DamageEvent {
    private static final Predicate legalAffected  = and(isIn(ofInstance(BATTLEFIELD)),
                                                                       card(or(CREATURE, PLANESWALKER)));
    
    private static final Predicate isPlaneswalker = card(has(PLANESWALKER));
    //TODO implement wither and lifelink
    private static final Predicate hasWither      = alwaysFalse();
    private static final Predicate hasLifelink    = alwaysFalse();
    
    private CardObject                          permanent;
    
    public DamagePermanentEvent(CardObject affected, MagicObject source, int ammount, boolean combat, boolean preventable) {
        super(affected, source, ammount, combat, preventable);
        if(!legalAffected.apply(affected)) throw new IllegalArgumentException(
                "affected must be a creature or planeswalker permanent: " + affected);
        permanent = affected;
    }
    
    public CardObject getPermanent() {
        return permanent;
    }
    
    @Override
    protected boolean execute0() {
        CompoundEdit ed = new CompoundEdit(getGame(), true, "Deal damage");
        
        //118.3b. Damage dealt to a planeswalker causes that many loyalty counters to be removed from that
        // planeswalker.
        if(isPlaneswalker.apply(getPermanent())) {
            //TODO remove counters
        }
        //118.3c. Damage dealt to a creature by a source with wither causes that many -1/-1 counters to be put on
        // that creature.
        else if(hasWither.apply(getSource())) {
            //TODO add counters
        }
        //118.3d. Damage dealt to a creature by a source without wither causes that much damage to be marked on
        // that creature.
        else {
            getPermanent().setMarkedDamage(getPermanent().getMarkedDamage() + getAmmount());
        }
        //118.3e. Damage dealt to an object or player by a source with lifelink causes that source's controller to
        // gain that much life, in addition to the damage's other results.
        if(hasLifelink.apply(getSource())) {
            getSource().getController().getLifeTotal().gainLife(getAmmount());
        }
        
        ed.end();
        
        return true;
    }
}


I don't really like this code, because it has the effects of damage hard coded, but I think it's fine for now. extracting these effects later if it's necessary shouldn't be too hard, as the different effects of damage will only be mentioned here, so I can safely delay this task.

Friday, July 23, 2010

Trying out the card editor

I just tried out my card editor to download "a few" cards; all the vanilla creatures and old (non-pain) dual lands. If I haven't done anything wrong in my gatherer search, there are 177 vanilla creatures. it's in fact not so easy to search for textless cards; I had to use the regular expressing "m/^$/" ("m/.../" is the gatherer identifier for regexes, "^$" essentially means "the beginning of the text immediately followed by the end")

by the way, I haven't done a full fledged form for gatherer searches; I did the search on the web site and pasted the search URL into my program. takes me much less time^^


there were two problems: first, my download just discontinued after 89 cards. Looking at what card that was, it was Little Girl from Unhinged with a half mana symbol. Second, even after refining my search to exclude Un-cards, my program only wound up downloading 100 cards. my workaround for that problem was simply to download the other cards by reverting the sort order^^



so, putting things short, I now have over 200 cards implemented, including 177 vanilla creatures, 10 classic dual lands, 10 SHM/EVE dual lands, 5 basic lands, Wrath of God, Damnation and Llanowar Elves. It's really time for combat^^

Thursday, July 22, 2010

Event Handling

If you recall what I wrote a long time ago about challenges in programming, event handling would be one of the easy, boring parts. The point of event handling is to inform parts of your program when something happens in another part. This is espacially important for the user interface, as you always want to see what's currently going on, but in the context of Magic, there is another very important reason for event handling: Triggered abilities.

If you now think that the User Interface and Triggered abilities can share the event handling system, therefore effectively reducing the ammount of programming needed for each of them, I fear you'll be disappointed. The reason for this is the undo system. While it enables things like handling illegal actions, the most direct interpretation of what it does prevents me from sharing one event system: Undo means that every action and event can happen in two directions in time.
When you attack with a creature, it becomes tapped. An ability could trigger from that tapping. If you now determine that the creature isn't allowed to attack, everything's undone and the creature is untapped again. You want to see the creature untapped in the user interface, but you don't want abilities trigger from it untapping.

Of course the event handling functions after the same principle, but the events are duplicated - in some sense. There's no real 1:1 mapping between GUI and game events, because the GUI is satisfied by state-changes, while the game needs more high level events: The gui doesn't care if you've drawn a card or just put it into your hand. It just needs to know that your library has become smaller and your hand grew larger.

Fortunately, Java has some built in functionality for handling these low-level events, namely PropertyChangeSupport. It allows you to keep track of properties and notify the listeners whenever a change occurs. Well, you still have to call the listeners on a change, but the major work, managing all the listeners and what properties they are interested in, is done for you.
Along with adding PropertyChangeSupport to Laterna Magica, I have restructured a lot of code. Previously, every class implemented undo support for its properties itself. This is now separated into an extra class, which also allows to use PropertyChangeSupport more easily:

public class EditableProperty extends AbstractGameContent {
    private EditablePropertyChangeSupport s;
    private String                        name;
    private T                             value;
   
    public EditableProperty(Game game, EditablePropertyChangeSupport s, String name) {
        this(game, s, name, null);
    }
   
    public EditableProperty(Game game, EditablePropertyChangeSupport s, String name, T initialValue) {
        super(game);
        this.s = s;
        this.name = name;
        value = initialValue;
    }
   
    public void setValue(T value) {
        new SetValueEdit(value).execute();
    }
   
    public T getValue() {
        return value;
    }
   
    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return valueOf(getValue());
    }
   
    private class SetValueEdit extends Edit {
        private static final long serialVersionUID = 93955529563844615L;
       
        private T                 oldValue, newValue;
       
        public SetValueEdit(T newValue) {
            super(EditableProperty.this.getGame());
            this.newValue = newValue;
        }
       
        @Override
        protected void execute() {
            oldValue = value;
            value = newValue;
            if(s != null) s.firePropertyChange(name, oldValue, newValue);
        }
       
        @Override
        protected void rollback() {
            value = oldValue;
            if(s != null) s.firePropertyChange(name, newValue, oldValue);
        }
       
        @Override
        public String toString() {
            return "Set " + s.getSourceBean() + "'s " + name + " to " + newValue;
        }
    }
}

Thursday, July 15, 2010

Combat in sight?

Both destruction and damage are more or less completed concepts by now, and at this point I'm doing combat. What does this mean?
Every turn, you and your opponent can arrange your creatures and planeswalkers in a more or less complex relationship
  • some creatures attack a player or planeswalker
  • other creatures block those attackers. A single attacker may be blocked by multiple blockers and vice-versa (granted you have the right abilities around)
  • all these attackers and blockers have a damage assignment order
  • in the end, they all deal damage according to it, and they do so simultaneously. my ideas of simultaneity are... well, limited.
so, that's only the rules part. to let the player take all of the many required actions, the Actor class needs a bunch new input methods. And the GUI needs a way to control, display and update what's going on. If you think that's a lot to do, you're right ;)

Thursday, July 1, 2010

Destruction

The last one and half a month were really sparse on working on Laterna Magica. It was the countdown of my school year and I was busy with a lot of stuff. There were loads of very work-intensive homeworks, and my year's project was also due. Anyone with experience on projects knows that half of the work is done in the two weeks before the end date and the other half is done in the two weeks after ;)

I can tell you, I didn't find a single minute to work on my program, but today I finally got back to it. I don't know if I can work on it regularly again, but I will try.

Before my big break, I told you that one of my next steps will be combat, but combat is a big thing and it takes many parts to work. One of these is damage.

Until very recent, damage was a simple concept: Players and creatures can receive damage. When a player receives damage, he looses life; when a creature receives enough damage, it is destroyed. However, two recent changes turned things around a bit: Planeswalkers, but more importantly Wither and the accompanying changes of Lifelink etc. To make things worse, damage has also another special concept found (nearly) nowhere else in the game: sources.

I suspect damage to be very annoying to program, but happily there's another thing to be done before damage really makes sense... Which happens to be what I've done today: Destruction, which was in fact so easy that I can fit it here without worrying that it will overload my post:

public class DestroyPermanentEvent extends ReplaceableEvent {
    private MagicObject o;
   
    public DestroyPermanentEvent(MagicObject o) {
        super(o);
        this.o = o;
    }
   
    @Override
    protected boolean execute0() {
        if(o.getZone().getType() != Zones.BATTLEFIELD) return false;
        o.setZone(o.getOwner().getGraveyard());
        return true;
    }
}

execute0() is very straightforward, which is possible because "destroy" only has one meaning, as opposed to damage, which would make a decision based on the receiver's type and both source's and receiver's abilities. Making DestroyPermanentEvent a ReplaceableEvent easily takes care of Regeneration and indestructibility. The only thing I'm not sure about is "... can't be regenerated".